Install Theme
Karimu KuduraEugenian for 20 yearsEugene, ORToday, we traveled down to Eugene OR to meet with students and instructors at the African American Rites of Passage Academy at Lane Community College. Since 1996, the academy has worked to address the cultural, career, academic, and social needs of high school and middle school African American and Multicultural students of African descent in Lane County, OR. Here, instructor Karimu Kudura starts their day with Tai Chi and meditation.© 2014 Intisar Abioto

Karimu Kudura
Eugenian for 20 years
Eugene, OR

Today, we traveled down to Eugene OR to meet with students and instructors at the African American Rites of Passage Academy at Lane Community College. Since 1996, the academy has worked to address the cultural, career, academic, and social needs of high school and middle school African American and Multicultural students of African descent in Lane County, OR. Here, instructor Karimu Kudura starts their day with Tai Chi and meditation.

© 2014 Intisar Abioto

This morning I headed down to Eugene with journalist Bruce Poinsette to document for Urban League PDX ‘s New State of Black Oregon. More photo updates coming..© 2014 Intisar Abioto

This morning I headed down to Eugene with journalist Bruce Poinsette to document for Urban League PDX ‘s New State of Black Oregon. More photo updates coming..
© 2014 Intisar Abioto

Some of you may remember Mychal Tetteh!  I first met and photographed him June of 2013. He was/is the president of the Major Taylor Cycling Club of Portland. Since that time Mychal has become the CEO of the Community Cycling Center on Alberta and is in the process of developing some sweet summer events for the community.
Right now, The Community Cycling Center is designing a Celebrating Diversity and Understanding Complex Histories Bike Ride. They want to know the people’s story in the Alberta Arts district. Who should they talk to? What locations should not be missed? If you are interested in learning more or giving them insight, please contact Zoe Piliafas. zoe@communitycyclingcenter.org© 2013 Intisar Abioto 

Some of you may remember Mychal Tetteh!  I first met and photographed him June of 2013. He was/is the president of the Major Taylor Cycling Club of Portland. Since that time Mychal has become the CEO of the Community Cycling Center on Alberta and is in the process of developing some sweet summer events for the community.


Right now, The Community Cycling Center is designing a Celebrating Diversity and Understanding Complex Histories Bike Ride. They want to know the people’s story in the Alberta Arts district. Who should they talk to? What locations should not be missed? If you are interested in learning more or giving them insight, please contact Zoe Piliafas. zoe@communitycyclingcenter.org

© 2013 Intisar Abioto 


Babes,

   The Black Portlanders is now on Instagram !

http://instagram.com/theblackportlanders

Follow us!

- Intisar of The BLK PDXERS

I don’t know if you all have yet noticed, but we’ve had a sweet redesign over here at The Black Portlanders. Thanks to Michele Kraus over at PDX Code School, The Black Portlanders’ web layout is looking much much swank than before… openness, clarity abounds.The story:In March, I did a very short talk at Research Club. Ním Wunnan, one of the organizers and an instructor at Portland Code School, offered me the opportunity to work with some emerging web development students to update The Black Portlanders’ webface. 
I was paired with Michele Kraus. She worked with me over the course of several weeks to get key design edits and technical integrations done. Check our social media icons above .. ! and be sure to follow us on our new instagram.So many thanks to Michele for her beautiful edits and design work. It really enhances this project and frames the photos beautifully. It makes so much difference in the experience of the images. That means so much. Many thanks to Nim and Portland Code School! Just thanks! I’m so happy to recommend Michele.  Find her at twitter.com/michelekraus.- Intisar of The BLKPDXERS

I don’t know if you all have yet noticed, but we’ve had a sweet redesign over here at The Black Portlanders. Thanks to Michele Kraus over at PDX Code School, The Black Portlanders’ web layout is looking much much swank than before… openness, clarity abounds.

The story:
In March, I did a very short talk at Research ClubNím Wunnan, one of the organizers and an instructor at Portland Code School, offered me the opportunity to work with some emerging web development students to update The Black Portlanders’ webface. 

I was paired with Michele Kraus. She worked with me over the course of several weeks to get key design edits and technical integrations done. Check our social media icons above .. ! and be sure to follow us on our new instagram.

So many thanks to Michele for her beautiful edits and design work. It really enhances this project and frames the photos beautifully. It makes so much difference in the experience of the images. That means so much. Many thanks to Nim and Portland Code School! Just thanks! I’m so happy to recommend Michele.  Find her at twitter.com/michelekraus.

- Intisar of The BLKPDXERS

Vanport Oral History and Media Production Workshop →

vanportmultimediaproject:

I am forwarding this on from Laura Lo Forti … Get in here if this is something you may be interested in. Exploring and documenting narratives around Vanport.

Michael
From NY
Portlander for 2 years

  What brought you here?

It was a girl. We broke up. I got a job. 

I was coming up Alder and rolled up on this guy stepping out of The Nines looking straight snazzed. I had to stop and photograph him. We shared a quick convo of laughs and funny banter about life - and life in Portland- before I rolled on up the street. Love that.

© 2014 Intisar Abioto 




Malik Al GhaniFrom Ouachita Parish, LAPortlander since early 90s.. After photographing him, I handed him my business card. He says to me, ”Where I come from we support Black business.”© 2014 Intisar Abioto

Malik Al Ghani
From Ouachita Parish, LA
Portlander since early 90s

.. After photographing him, I handed him my business card. He says to me, ”Where I come from we support Black business.”

© 2014 Intisar Abioto

Brittany GipsonFrom Oakland CAVisiting Portlander.. in residence I met Brittany Thursday during the First Thursday Art Walk in the Pearl. I started walking towards her and she’d already seen me and was smiling. She has only been here a few weeks, but I don’t believe she’d met many Black people yet.  She is from Oakland, but she is doing her grad work in visual studies - installation art and watercolor - at Pacific Northwest College of Art over the next three summers.  This is the first of those summers… so she’s a new quasi-Portlander. Ha!
 Her work was recently chosen by PNCA visiting artist Shirley Tse to be exhibited as a part Tse’s show, Quantum Shirley. It will be up at Philip Feldman Gallery at PNCA through August 10th. And you can check out her work at bregipson.com© 2014 Intisar Abioto 

Brittany Gipson
From Oakland CA
Visiting Portlander.. in residence 

I met Brittany Thursday during the First Thursday Art Walk in the Pearl. I started walking towards her and she’d already seen me and was smiling. She has only been here a few weeks, but I don’t believe she’d met many Black people yet.  She is from Oakland, but she is doing her grad work in visual studies - installation art and watercolor - at Pacific Northwest College of Art over the next three summers.  This is the first of those summers… so she’s a new quasi-Portlander. Ha!

 Her work was recently chosen by PNCA visiting artist Shirley Tse to be exhibited as a part Tse’s show, Quantum ShirleyIt will be up at Philip Feldman Gallery at PNCA through August 10th. 
And you can check out her work at bregipson.com

© 2014 Intisar Abioto 

Flora, Matthew, JusticeCentral Point, OR … 270 miles outside of Portland ORJune 2014
I know many of you have been wondering what is going on with The Black Portlanders. Well, I haven’t jumped ship!  I’ve been working really hard on a few surprises and here’s the first of a few! I’m super excited to announce that The Black Portlanders is working in collaboration with the Urban League of Portland to produce the next State of Black Oregon. I am joining as photographic director to expand this groundbreaking work. First published in 2009, the newest State of Black Oregon will combine data, exploratory photography/imagery, and narrative and lived experience to illustrate the social and economic reality of Black Oregonians.

My goal within the project will be to photograph and illustrate the diverse presence of Black people in Oregon, both urban and rural. Along with photographing in Portland, I’ll be traveling with the Urban League to photograph and interview Black Oregonians in Ashland, Eugene, Bend, and Coos Bay area. 

Beyond these locations, over the next 2 months I will doing some personal travels throughout Oregon to photograph and meet Black Oregonians throughout the state.
What does Black Oregon look like? Who are Black Oregonians? Where are we? I know about Oregon generally, but where are people of African descent within the fullness of Oregon’s landscape?  I don’t have a working mental image of what Black Oregon looks like. Do you? Exactly!

I’m excited to make this journey out into  Oregon state to find out. I’ll be publishing photographs, travel updates, and questions here - alongside images of Black Portlanders. You can also follow this evolution of The State of Black Oregon through Urban League of Portland’s social media channels, as well.This is happening, but I need your help with contacts!Who in Oregon should I talk to.. and where in Oregon state I should go? Right now I’m seeking to connect with, meet up with, and photograph Black Oregonians throughout Oregon.Here’s how you can help. 
 Do you know people or organizations I should connect with in Eugene, Bend, Coos Bay area, and Eastern and rural Oregon … that might help us connect with Black people in these areas? I want to meet them!
Do you know someone of Black or African descent in ANY part of Oregon who might be open to talking with me and/or being photographed? Please connect us!
I’m willing to go most anywhere. Seriously! Any insight you might have will be so welcome and will help create this right now.
Please write me at theblackportlanders@gmail.com with information or ideas you might have! Any ideas - big or small - will be very much appreciated
Thank you!
Intisar Abioto … of The Black Oregonians! 

About The State of Black Oregon:
In 2009, the Urban League of Portland released the State of Black Oregon Report, the first of its kind in the state. It illustrated the community’s humanity and resilience, providing a human face to the issues of poverty, discrimination, gentrification, educational achievement and entrepreneurship. As the first major snapshot of one of Oregon’s growing communities of color, it was a significant event in the State. It was a groundbreaking report, combining data, narrative and lived experience to illustrate the social and economic reality of Black Oregonians.  It told the story of Oregon’s Black community and illustrated its humanity and resilience, providing a human face to the issues of poverty, gentrification, educational achievement and entrepreneurship. The State of Black Oregon also set out solutions and issued a call to action.
Five years later, the Urban League of Portland will produce a new and innovative State of Black Oregon. Like the original, the new project will be fully informed by Black Oregonians across the State. It will be owned by, written by, and for the community, covering the places in urban and rural Oregon, where the presence of the Black community is often overlooked. These Oregonians will be paramount in telling their own story. The report will illuminate the experiences of Black Oregonians all over the state, including Eugene, Bend, Coos Bay and Eastern and rural Oregon. The State of Black Oregon 2014 will provide an opportunity for many to tell their story for the first time.
The 2014 State of Black Oregon Report Will Include:
·  An innovative and unique approach to updated national, state and local data on Black Oregonians on a number of social and economic indicators. 
·  A photographic journey/survey imaging Oregon’s diverse Black population
·  New personal stories and gripping case studies
·  Updated policy recommendations in each focus area
·  A closer look at the Black LGBTQ Oregonian community, at older adults. and the African / immigrant refugee community.
What do you want the future to look like?  This report is the next step towards a positive and healthy world for Black Oregonians and for all. Follow the journey of State of Black Oregon at theblackportlanders.com & ..facebook.com/ulpdxtwitter.com/ulpdx http://ulpdx.tumblr.com/
 #thestateofblackoregon #theblkpdxers #theblackportlanders

Flora, Matthew, Justice
Central Point, OR … 270 miles outside of Portland OR
June 2014


I know many of you have been wondering what is going on with The Black Portlanders. Well, I haven’t jumped ship!  I’ve been working really hard on a few surprises and here’s the first of a few!
 
I’m super excited to announce that The Black Portlanders is working in collaboration with the Urban League of Portland to produce the next State of Black Oregon. I am joining as photographic director to expand this groundbreaking work. First published in 2009, the newest State of Black Oregon will combine data, exploratory photography/imagery, and narrative and lived experience to illustrate the social and economic reality of Black Oregonians.

My goal within the project will be to photograph and illustrate the diverse presence of Black people in Oregon, both urban and rural. Along with photographing in Portland, I’ll be traveling with the Urban League to photograph and interview Black Oregonians in Ashland, Eugene, Bend, and Coos Bay area. 

Beyond these locations, over the next 2 months I will doing some personal travels throughout Oregon to photograph and meet Black Oregonians throughout the state.


What does Black Oregon look like? Who are Black Oregonians? Where are we? I know about Oregon generally, but where are people of African descent within the fullness of Oregon’s landscape?  I don’t have a working mental image of what Black Oregon looks like.
Do you? 
Exactly!

I’m excited to make this journey out into  Oregon state to find out. I’ll be publishing photographs, travel updates, and questions here - alongside images of Black Portlanders. You can also follow this evolution of The State of Black Oregon through Urban League of Portland’s social media channels, as well.

This is happening, but I need your help with contacts!

Who in Oregon should I talk to.. and where in Oregon state I should go? Right now I’m seeking to connect with, meet up with, and photograph Black Oregonians throughout Oregon.

Here’s how you can help.

Do you know people or organizations I should connect with in Eugene, Bend, Coos Bay area, and Eastern and rural Oregon … that might help us connect with Black people in these areas? I want to meet them!

Do you know someone of Black or African descent in ANY part of Oregon who might be open to talking with me and/or being photographed? Please connect us!

I’m willing to go most anywhere. Seriously! Any insight you might have will be so welcome and will help create this right now.

Please write me at theblackportlanders@gmail.com with information or ideas you might have! Any ideas - big or small - will be very much appreciated

Thank you!

Intisar Abioto … of The Black Oregonians! 



About The State of Black Oregon:

In 2009, the Urban League of Portland released the State of Black Oregon Report, the first of its kind in the state. It illustrated the community’s humanity and resilience, providing a human face to the issues of poverty, discrimination, gentrification, educational achievement and entrepreneurship. As the first major snapshot of one of Oregon’s growing communities of color, it was a significant event in the State. It was a groundbreaking report, combining data, narrative and lived experience to illustrate the social and economic reality of Black Oregonians.  It told the story of Oregon’s Black community and illustrated its humanity and resilience, providing a human face to the issues of poverty, gentrification, educational achievement and entrepreneurship. The State of Black Oregon also set out solutions and issued a call to action.

Five years later, the Urban League of Portland will produce a new and innovative State of Black Oregon. Like the original, the new project will be fully informed by Black Oregonians across the State. It will be owned by, written by, and for the community, covering the places in urban and rural Oregon, where the presence of the Black community is often overlooked. These Oregonians will be paramount in telling their own story. The report will illuminate the experiences of Black Oregonians all over the state, including Eugene, Bend, Coos Bay and Eastern and rural Oregon. The State of Black Oregon 2014 will provide an opportunity for many to tell their story for the first time.

The 2014 State of Black Oregon Report Will Include:

·  An innovative and unique approach to updated national, state and local data on Black Oregonians on a number of social and economic indicators. 

·  A photographic journey/survey imaging Oregon’s diverse Black population

·  New personal stories and gripping case studies

·  Updated policy recommendations in each focus area

·  A closer look at the Black LGBTQ Oregonian community, at older adults. and the African / immigrant refugee community.

What do you want the future to look like?  This report is the next step towards a positive and healthy world for Black Oregonians and for all.


Follow the journey of State of Black Oregon at
theblackportlanders.com & ..

facebook.com/ulpdx
twitter.com/ulpdx
http://ulpdx.tumblr.com/


#thestateofblackoregon #theblkpdxers #theblackportlanders


Robert
From Nashville, TN
Portlander for 40 years

YES. 

— NE Alberta & 15th

© 2014 Intisar Abioto 

Nikki Brown Clown
Portland Native

.. I think Nikki’s image speaks for itself. 
Find and book her at PDXBrownClown

- NW Park Blocks
© 2014 
Intisar Abioto

Dontrelle
Portland OR
Native

… stopped him skateboarding up Burnside.


© 2014 Intisar Abioto

Ripley Snell
From Chico, CA
Portlander for 8 years

Ripley is an artist.. a rapper, songwriter, and a part of the Futro Collective.
I met him in April at Stumptown Coffee downtown. He made me some coffee. I drank it. We talked for a spell.  

His music is niiiiice.
I’m particularly fond of “High Fructose Love” from his latest EP, 6 Natural FlavorsYou can listen to 6 Natural Flavors in its entirety at ripleysnell.com
It’s worth it.

And be sure to check out his recent feature in Willamette Week.

-NW Park Blocks
© 2014 Intisar Abioto

RedrayOriginally from Jamaica Queens, New YorkPortlander for 12 yearsRan into Redray downtown. I noticed his style immediately. He’s a “rock n soul singer/songwriter/musician.” You can find some of his music at http://www.reverbnation.com/redrayfrazier© 2014 Intisar Abioto

Redray
Originally from Jamaica Queens, New York
Portlander for 12 years

Ran into Redray downtown. I noticed his style immediately. He’s
 a “rock n soul singer/songwriter/musician.” You can find some of his music at http://www.reverbnation.com/redrayfrazier

© 2014 Intisar Abioto